Dark-backed Weaver

Ploceus bicolor

The Afrikaans name for the Dark-backed Weaver is Bosmusikant – “Bush musician” – and a most descriptive moniker that is given its melodious whistling tune, often delivered in duet. This bird has an extremely patchy distribution over the southern half of Africa. Locally they’re found in evergreen forests and dense riverine woodland along our coastline and a bit further inland from Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape through Kwazulu-Natal to the border with Mozambique.

Dark-backed Weavers are omnivores, feeding on invertebrates, fruit, flowers and nectar. While they often associate in mixed flocks with other insectivorous birds they never seem to mix with other kinds of weavers. They form permanent, territorial pairs that breed in spring and summer. Weaving the nest at the tip of a thin, bare branch, using vines, creepers and slender leaves, is mostly performed by the male but sometimes the female will help. The clutch of 2-4 eggs are incubated for a little longer than 2 weeks, with the chicks fledging when they’re about 3 weeks old but remaining with their parents for almost two months after leaving the nest. Adults weigh 35g and measure 15cm in length.

The IUCN considers the Dark-backed Weaver to be of least concern.

23 thoughts on “Dark-backed Weaver

  1. naturebackin

    These are lovely birds and I enjoyed the photos – they look especially cute in the small groups in the trailcam shots. We are most fortunate that they visit our garden birdbaths from time to time. It is always such a thrill to hear them call.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

Please don't leave without sharing your thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.