Bush Karoo Rat

Myotomys (Otomys) unisulcatus

The Bush Karoo Rat occurs in the drier parts of South Africa’s south-west (Northern, Western and Eastern Cape) and marginally into extreme southern Namibia. Their preferred habitat is areas with good vegetation coverage, such as that found along drainage lines, in the arid Karoo scrublands and semi-desert of the west coast. They feed on the seeds, berries, flowers, leaves and bulbs of a wide variety of plants (up to 60 species have been recorded for some populations), with succulents providing their required water intake. Including their relatively short tails, Bush Karoo Rats grow to an average of 24cm in length and weigh around 125g.

Bush Karoo Rats are mainly diurnal in nature, living in family groups numbering up to 11 rats that share a “lodge” – a large structure built of sticks, twigs, grass, kelp, bones, fur, and even shells and human litter, usually in or under the protection of a thorny bush. From the lodge a network of paths used to gather food radiate into the surrounding vegetation, with family members often bringing food back to store at the lodge. They will also readily climb into trees and bushes to reach food and to sun themselves. Bush Karoo Rats breed throughout the year, with litters of 1-5 young born after a 38 day gestation. They have a short life expectancy of less than 2 years in the wild.

The IUCN lists the Bush Karoo Rat as being of least concern, describing it as abundant in suitable habitat.

Advertisements

32 thoughts on “Bush Karoo Rat

  1. perdebytjie

    So ‘n egte Suid-Afrikaanse natuurlike rot is darem pragtig! Meeste mense se assosiasie met rotte en muise, is die aaklige indringers van Europa, wat hier aangekom het met skepe. Pragtige foto’s en inligting, Dries!

    Like

    Reply
    1. de Wets Wild Post author

      Most small rodents have a very short lifespan, P J B – they have such fast metabolisms and heavy breeding cycles, but they also probably feature on the menu of most of the predators that share their range; from mongooses, raptors and snakes up to large wild cats and canids.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
    1. de Wets Wild Post author

      They do become quite tame around humans, even in wild populations living in close proximity to human dwellings (such as in rest camps in game parks in their range), but it would be a real pity if some people decide to cage them.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

Please don't leave without sharing your thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.