Queen Elizabeth Park Nature Reserve

Queen Elizabeth Park Nature Reserve is located in the hills in the northern suburbs of the city of Pietermaritzburg, the capital of KwaZulu-Natal Province, and about eight kilometres from the city centre. It serves as the location for the head office of the provincial conservation agency, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, world renowned especially for their achievements in saving the white rhinoceros from extinction.

Queen Elizabeth Park

Queen Elizabeth Park

Entrance is free and a short drive into the reserve provides access to three shady picnic areas and the self-guided iDube trail. There’s no accommodation available inside the reserve.

The road through the reserve

The road through the reserve

One of the picnic spots

One of the picnic spots

iDube Trail

iDube Trail

Several game species (including plains zebra, bushbuck, dassie and the rare blue duiker) and a wide variety of birds occur in this small nature reserve, established in 1960 and only 93 hectares in extent, which protects a surprising diversity of habitats ranging from grassland to forest surrounded by a sea of urbanisation.

Chorister Robin-Chat

Chorister Robin-Chat

Bushbuck

Bushbuck

Drongo

Drongo

Forest patch

Forest patch

Aloes

Aloes

Bushbuck ewe

Bushbuck ewe

The Queen Elizabeth Park Nature Reserve is a fantastic asset to the people of Pietermaritzburg and especially those in search of some respite from the hustle and bustle of city life. It is a good thing though that we aren’t employed at the Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife headquarters, because we won’t ever be in the office!

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22 thoughts on “Queen Elizabeth Park Nature Reserve

  1. Pingback: Kamberg Nature Reserve | de Wets Wild

      1. Myuri

        Thank you very much, almost 8 months in and still enjoying it! Sadly im about to go for a jog in the park and the storm begins! No stunning views for me today.

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  2. Pingback: Midmar Dam Nature Reserve | de Wets Wild

    1. de Wets Wild Post author

      Spot on AJ! I work at the head office of our country’s (and one of the world’s) premier conservation agency in Pretoria and Marilize operates her own travel business specialising in South African outdoor destinations. Aren’t we blessed!? 🙂

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    1. de Wets Wild Post author

      This particular species inhabits forests and other densely vegetated places on the wetter eastern side of South Africa PJB, and they are normally very shy and secretive. We were very surprised at this one’s calm disposition!

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  3. Tish Farrell

    Lovely shots. Was once told by a Kenyan naturalist in the Rift that the presence of aloes signalled an absence of elephants, since they love to eat them. I’ve smiled about this for years since – whenever I see aloes in fact.

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    1. de Wets Wild Post author

      Hi Seeker! There aren’t any animals that would deliberately try and kill people for a meal at Queen Elizabeth Park, but if they feel threatened or cornered most of the larger animals may decide to charge so it is always better to give the animals enough space when you encounter them on foot.

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