Turner’s Thick-toed Gecko

Chondrodactylus turneri

Also known as Turner’s Giant Gecko for its impressive size (adults measure up to 10cm in length excluding their tail), Turner’s Thick-toed Gecko is a solitary, nocturnal species occurring in semi-desert and arid savannas, usually in rocky outcrops but also occasionally in or around houses. In the spring season females lay 2 or 3 clutches of 2 eggs each in holes dug in the sand. The eggs take 2 to 3 months to hatch. Turner’s Thick-toed Gecko is a carnivore, feeding primarily on insects and other invertebrates. In South Africa, this species is found in parts of Mpumalanga, Limpopo, the North West and Northern Cape provinces.

21 thoughts on “Turner’s Thick-toed Gecko

    1. de Wets Wild Post author

      When hearing the word “gecko” I also don’t immediately think of giants like these, and to see something that size stuck to a wall or hanging from the ceiling, as gecko’s do, is breathtaking!

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    1. de Wets Wild Post author

      Ek het hierdie nog nooit gehoor enige geluide maak nie, nee Una. Maar ons het ook geitjies wat lekker kan “gesels” – ek dink byvoorbeeld aan die Kalahari se blafgeitjies.

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    1. de Wets Wild Post author

      Nice when we share interests with our pets, Lois. Though your and your cats’ respective interests in geckos probably do not stem from the same reasons, so the geckos probably like you more than the cats… 🙂

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