Two-pip Policeman

Coeliades pisistratus

The Two-pip Policeman butterfly is a denizen of coastal bush and savanna habitats, occurring from Kwazulu-Natal through Mpumalanga, Limpopo, Gauteng and North West to the Free State and eastern portions of the Northern Cape Province. Furthermore it is found widely over the remainder of sub-Saharan Africa in similar habitats. Eggs are laid singly and the larvae feed on a wide range of plants, their development from egg to adult butterfly taking around two months to complete. Adults have a wingspan of 4.5 – 7cm and can be seen throughout the year. They fly fast and erratic and adults of both sexes are frequently seen at flowers or mud puddles, usually in the early morning or late afternoon. Males are territorial.

21 thoughts on “Two-pip Policeman

    1. de Wets Wild Post author

      They’re one of those creatures that make us wonder if what we thought we know is true; i.e. what makes a butterfly a butterfly and what makes a moth a moth.
      As the Two-pip Policeman has “plain” antennae they’re counted as butterflies, as opposed to the fancy, feathery antennae of moths.
      In the end they’re all from the Lepidoptera family in any case, so the distinction between butterflies and moths is an artificial division.

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    1. de Wets Wild Post author

      Maklikste om hulle uitmekaar te ken is om na die voelhorings te kyk, Tina. Skoenlappers het reguit dun voelers, terwyl motte se voelers soos vere of blare lyk. Maar daar is altyd uitsonderings op die reël en eintlik is motte en skoenlappers uit dieselfde familie.

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